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Patricia Alessandrini
Saturday the 7th of may at 20:00 at Granhøj Dans presenting
External link: www.alessandrini.virb.com
Patricia Alessandrini
Composer
 
How would you characterize the potential of art?
Art has the potential to create an engaging experience: an experience which may engage some combination of one's emotions and intellect, and may both access and create memory. Something is always changed by this experience, and it may set off a chain of further changes. These changes may be in one's perception of the world, but may contribute to social and/or political change as new ways of imagining existing situations are created. In the case of a particularly powerful work, these changes may appear to be inevitable. At the same time, a work may touch upon one's intuition in such a way as to seem as if it already existed in one's mind and was released by one's own imagination. As a work of art may eventually engage many individuals, or diverse communities of individuals, the shared experience of it creates the potential for new experiences, exchanges, and other works of art.

Art has the potential to create an engaging experience: an experience which may engage various combinations of one's emotions and intellect, and may both access and create memory. Something is always changed by this experience, and it may set off a chain of further changes.

Which possibilities, qualities and limitations do you find in sound as material?
Our sense of hearing, like our sense of smell, may be engaged without effort, even against one's will, and depends principally on one's spatial relationship to the sound source; whereas our sense of vision is more intentional (to cite Merleau-Ponty's description of seeing). Therefore, even if one is not actively listening, sound has the potential to deeply penetrate into various strata of memory. 
In active listening, complex cognitive structures may be created; what is particularly exciting about this process is that it depends both on memories of previous listening experiences and on the spontaneous creation of new structures particular to the present sonic experience. This may be true even in the case of a work one has already heard. Even listening to the same recording in a different environment may engender new structures, creating relationships one had not previously experienced. Because our visual sense of recognition is so strong (although not at all infallible), sound has a great potential to engage both memory and imagination, as we may try to visualize a sound whose source we cannot see. 
Using electronics with live instruments introduces new possibilities for creating sonic illusions, in which it is difficult to distinguish "real" from "unreal" sound, effectively enlarging the possibilities of the instruments to include the "unreal". I am particularly interested in physical modeling: a type of sound synthesis able to create convincing simulations of sonic situations that would be impossible in the physical world. I hope to engage the imagination of the listener through the cognitive dissonance resulting from sounds rooted in both a real and an imaginary world.

What characterizes a good work of sound/musical art?
I wouldn't presume that I know what a good work of sonic art is. The works which affect me the most have a certain complexity, and thus present themselves differently to me upon multiple listenings. They often enrich the listening experience by touching upon various worlds of memory and association.

What moves you?
I hope that I don't yet know what is capable of moving me, so that I may be constantly open to the possibility of a new experience moving me.
 
 
Simon Løffler

SPOR2011